List Of Places To Visit In London

London’s well-kept secret is the wealth of historical areas, buildings, and monuments to visit. Londoners are very proud of their heritage, whether it be Kings and Queens, battles won against the odds, or just standing up to oppression. Listed below are just a few places that you really should consider visiting if you have the time:

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British museum

British Museum – Founded in 1753, this is the UK’s largest museum and one of the oldest public museums in the world. It houses an encyclopedic collection of historic treasures from all over the world, including Egyptian mummies, Roman emperors’ busts, and prehistoric fossils. The price for entry to this prestigious institution is free.

Downing street

Downing Street – If you want to see where the Prime Minister lives at Number 10, you can … provided that his or her car isn’t already parked there! Just turn up one afternoon and wait outside the gates of Downing street on any random day, but I suggest visiting around lunchtime as they say good morning very promptly at about 12.00.

Buckingham palace

Buckingham Palace – The Queen lives here! Well, she has done since her accession to the throne in 1952 after the death of King George VI. This is London’s most visited Royal residence and you are allowed to stand outside the gates for as long as you like peering through them or taking photos but be careful not to step onto the grass as a guard may be peering back at you from behind his formidable-looking rifle.

Royal Albert Hall

Royal Albert Hall – This is another iconic London landmark, this time housing an auditorium that can seat up to 5,000 people and was built in 1871 under the patronage of Queen Victoria’s consort Prince Albert. As well as hosting world-famous stars such as The Beatles, Ella Fitzgerald, and Elton John, it also houses the BBC Proms every summer when outstanding international talent is brought to perform at this famous venue.

Tower of London

Tower of London – One of London’s most visited attractions during the early Middle Ages, it was a place of imprisonment for prisoners of great renown and a place to display a severed head as a warning to those who might be considering treachery. It was also the scene of three executions by beheading, including Anne Boleyn in 1536 and Queen Marie Antoinette from France during the French Revolution of 1789. Entry is now free but they do charge for certain exhibitions, the Tower Bridge exhibition being one of them.

Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey – One of London’s most historic buildings, it is here that the coronation ceremony of every monarch since William the Conqueror in 1066 has taken place. It also houses the final resting places of many notable people including Geoffrey Chaucer, Charles Darwin, and Isaac Newton. This impressive building is open to visitors during the week and on Saturdays.

St Paul’s Cathedral

St Paul’s Cathedral – The seat of the Bishop of London since this cathedral was built in 1666, it is one of England’s most iconic buildings. It has the second largest dome in the world, beaten only by St Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. Visitors can climb to the top for a fantastic view of London, peep inside its vaults and underground cloisters, or just admire the architecture from ground level.

The Monument

The Monument – Built-in memory of the Great Fire of London which ravaged much of London’s old town during September 1666, The Monument is a very singular structure looking rather like a 202ft tall stone cigar. You can climb the 311 steps to the top of it for a fantastic view over London, peep through its glass viewing windows, or just admire it from ground level.

The Tower of London

The Tower of London – One of London’s most visited attractions during the early Middle Ages, it was a place of imprisonment for prisoners of great renown and a place to display a severed head as a warning to those who might be considering treachery. It was also the scene of three executions by beheading, including Anne Boleyn in 1536 and Queen Marie Antoinette from France during the French Revolution of 1789. Entry is now free but they do charge for certain exhibitions, the Tower Bridge exhibition being one of them.

The Royal Albert Hall

The Royal Albert Hall – This is another iconic London landmark, this time housing an auditorium that can seat up to 5,000 people and was built in 1871 under the patronage of Queen Victoria’s consort Prince Albert. As well as hosting world-famous stars such as The Beatles, Ella Fitzgerald, and Elton John, it also houses the BBC Proms every summer when outstanding international talent is brought to perform at this famous venue.

If you can visit these places or any other place then take a ride in one of our beautiful vehicles, driven by professional chauffeurs, and experience a fantastic tour of London!

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